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Our histories of the First World War often focus on those who died. This project follows those who survived as they pursued their careers in the 1920s and 30s. It presents an alternate account of the importance of WWI to Australian nation-building, one founded not on the battlefield of Gallipoli, but in the expansion and professionalization of expertise.

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ARC Research Highlight

ARC Research Highlight

To coincide with ANZAC Day 2017, the Australian Research Council has published the following piece on the ExpertNation project: Expert Nation: Universities, War and 1920s and 1930s Australia—24 April 2017 The First World War was a new kind of war, arguably the first ‘modern war’ in which science and knowledge were to play a critical role. In a conflict that was fought as much by experts as by expeditionary forces, Australian university graduates played an […]

Trixie Whitehead: Intelligence and the First World War

Trixie Whitehead: Intelligence and the First World War

British intelligence tends to conjure up thoughts of MI6, James Bond and of course the Cold War. It was WWI, however, that was the first international conflict that British intelligence agencies became an important part of the government’s overall war effort. This is of particular relevance to the Expert Nation project. While doing research on the graduates of the Women’s College within the University of […]

Symposium: World War 1, the Universities and the Professions

Symposium: World War 1, the Universities and the Professions

  Save the dates: 12 & 13 October 2017  at Melbourne University The World War I, the Universities and the Professions symposium will bring together a group of researchers, each examining a different profession, grouped into four general themes: Medicine and Health, Science and Engineering, the Humanities and Social Sciences, and the Arts. Themes to be explored include: the impact of World War I on […]

Announcements

The Symposium World War One, Universities and the Professions was held on 12 & 13 October 2017  at the University of Melbourne.

Bringing together a group of academics, each examining a different profession. Presentations were grouped into five sessions:
  • The Arts: Design, Music and Writing
  • Teaching, Languages and the Law
  • Medical Sciences
  • Science and Technology
  • Government, Accounting and Anthropology
Themes explored included:
  • the impact of World War I on professional training and practice, including developments as a result of wartime research, interruption to and changes in training and university instruction, and accreditation, during and after the war
  • the post-war development of the professions, including the emergence of ‘new’ occupations, the formation and development of professional associations, the changing status of professional groups, shifts in professional membership (in terms of gender, age etc.)
  • how wartime mobility for those in the military and on other war work contributed to the development of the professions, including through enhanced national and international networks
  • how the role of the university as a place of research, and the scope of professional training, was understood and contributed to expertise
For more information please contact expert.nation@sydney.edu.au